Archive for the Bar/Beer Talk Category

Rattle N Hum wins the Good Beer Seal

Posted in Bar/Beer Talk on May 27, 2010 by RattleNHumBar

Rattle N Hum was awarded ‘Good Beer Seal’ on Tuesday night 5/25.

All our hard work has been recognized thanks to all our awesome friends. Thank you NY and we are determined to keep on serving you the best damn beers we can get our hands on!

We work hard here to keep our beers in great shape and cleanliness of our beer lines is always top priority, again CHEERS.

A little info into the Good Beer Seal:

As New Yorkers, we know there has been an explosion of quality local breweries over the last decade, including the Captain Lawrence, Chelsea Brewing Company, Brooklyn Brewery, Kelso and Six Point. In direct response, there has been the rapid growth of pubs, bars and restaurants that pride themselves on local brews, great service, and rich community roots. Until now, there has not been an association that recognizes establishments that pride themselves on serving quality, craft beers (like Rattle N Hum of course!). To remedy this, Garry Gillis (Burp Castle and Standings), Ray Deter (DBA and DBA Williamsburg), and Jimmy (Jimmys 43) joined together to form The Good Beer Seal (goodbeerseal.com).

The Good Beer Seal of Approval is awarded to bars and restaurants who:

1. Have 80% craft domestic or special imported beers.

2. Serve a good portion of their beers via a draft beer and/or cask ale program

3. Maintain a strong “Pub” vibe as a nice, local place to drink a beer and visit with friends.

4. Active community presence, as well as being an independently operated establishment

5. Good beer should be a strong feature if not THE FOCUS of the operation

The Good Beer Seal will be actively promoting New York City as a destination for lovers of good beer, also spearheading “July Good Beer Month,” an annual month long festival which celebrates local establishments, our communities and the Good Beer we serve.

Remember July is Good Beer Month, tell a friend and introduce Him/Her to the wonderful world of Craft Beer!

Cheers,

Patrick

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Call to Action: Support Small Breweries (HR 2178)

Posted in Bar/Beer Talk on March 26, 2010 by RattleNHumBar

Call to Action: Support Small Breweries (HR 4278)

Last December, Representatives Richie Neal (D-MA) and Kevin Brady (R-TX) co-sponsored a bill “to amend the Internal Revenue code of 1986 to provide a reduced rate of excise tax on beer produced domestically by certain small producers.”

Representatives Neal and Brady, and, as of this writing, 31 other representatives, want to help out small brewers. First, let’s talk about what “small” means, then we’ll get into how this help will occur.

The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) considers a small brewery to be one producing less than 2,000,000 barrels (bbl) of beer annually. FYI, that’s a lot of beer. If a brewery with a 50 bbl system – like Great Divide, for example – were to brew 3 batches a day, 365 days a year, that would be 164,250 barrels a year. And they don’t do that. The can’t without a lot more fermentation tanks. Boston Beer Co. (aka Sam Adams) recently passed the 2,000,000 barrels a year mark.

Just for overall reference, here are the estimated production levels of some breweries. These numbers either come from the brewery themselves or Wikipedia (I know, I know..), and the data ranges from 2007 through 2009. It’s just to give you a general idea of where these breweries stand.

The point being small is relative. Many of the big craft brewers just barely break the 60,000 bbl annual production mark. My example, Great Divide, isn’t even close to that line, and they make a lot of beer.

Moving on.

Currently, breweries pay $7/bbl for the first 60,000 bbls, and $18/bbl for any additional barrels, up to 2,000,000 bbls. This reduced rate for under 60,000 bbls came into being in 1976, under H.R. 3605. (Check out the Brewers Association’shistorical memo when this passed.) Up to that point, there was a flat rate tax of $9/bbl for every barrel, as long as the brewery produced under 2,000,000 bbls annually. H.R. 3605 created a reduced rate of $7/bbl for the first 60,000 bbls, which is still in place today. Obviously, the second tier of the tax has increased since then.

H.R. 4278 would cut the excise tax for the first 60,000 bbls in half, saving brewers $3.50 a barrel. It would also lower the second step from $18 to $16.

For a brewery producing exactly 60,000 bbls annually, this bill would save them $210,000. If Great Divide produced the exact same amount under the bill, they would save $42,245. Consider that a new 50bbl fermenting vessel is about $25,000 after shipping, installation, all the other stuff that goes with it, etc. Figure that a full time employee making $15/hr would receive about $30,000 annually in wages. I realize I’m using pretty simple math here, and not taking into account taxes and other fees on equipment and employees. However, it’s easy to see how this tax cut will make up for itself pretty quickly.

More jobs AND more beer. Cheers!

Ratebeer.com & Rattle ‘N’ Hum 1/11/10

Posted in Bar/Beer Talk on January 11, 2010 by RattleNHumBar

Check this out: http://ratebeer.com/places/top-rated/

Yeah, Thee best website for beer ratings and local drinking enthusiast’s has rated Rattle ‘N’ Hum number 39 in the world rankings of top beer destinations.

This is crazy for us as we are only open just over a year. It brings upon huge responsibility to constantly strive to be better and better, to look after passionate beer drinkers.

Since we opened we have been very dedicated to keeping our beer lines (both cask and draft) clean and fresh, by using a cleaning powder from Austria that is very advanced and was tested by Budweiser for 3 years before being approved. Now this product is used every day at RNH,

Here at Rattle ‘N’ Hum we clean our beer lines after every keg has been kicked, for the last 6 months we started using a new product to insure the cleanliness of our lines continues thus giving you the freshest, tastiest beer imaginable, the way the brewer’s intended. We are using a product from Austria that has been in testing with AB for 3 years. It’s a verification agent with line cleaning solution in powder form. We can monitor the cleaning process and inline verification with a color indicator. Chlorine free with active oxygen. It is compliant with DIN 6650 and HACCP norms.

We think that our customers have every right in knowing what happens behind the scenes of RNH as you are trusting us with your health and hope of great clean beer!!

So now you have it, peace of mind!

Thanks Ratebeer.com and everyone that appreciates what we do here.

Best,

Patrick

Craft Beer Week Aftermath! Big Thanks

Posted in Bar/Beer Talk on September 25, 2009 by RattleNHumBar

I hope everyone enjoyed NY Craft Beer Week, for us it marked our 1st year anniversary (which a party is in the works very soon) last week I think RNH got a little crazy with the Cask Ale festival and having two brewmaster nights every night was a little nuts I have to say, but we got through it! 25 kegs a day were changed to prepare for each night as we show cased many breweries beers during the week. 60 casks were drank with about 10 we never had a chance to put on, but will be showing up at the cask bar in the near future.

I would really like to thank the unsong heroes of such a crazy week as last week.  For months I worked with Union, S.K.I, Manhattan, American Beer and so many breweries just preparing for this week. It took about 8 months to gather all the rare casks and kegs we had on offer for the week and would not have been done without the help and dedication of the NY area beer distributors. Union Beer distributers: Andrew McLeod, Red Daquel and Audrey Squaresky were absolutely amazing in organizing over 70% of all beer coming into RNH and man what organizing was down by this team. The same goes for Mike & Alex of SKI, John Mish of Manhattan, Gen of Beehive and Joe of American Beer.

Our staff also were truly amazing, I have thanked all personally already.

Thanks to all, until the next one!

Patrick

RNH Staff on course to taking Cicerone exam

Posted in Bar/Beer Talk on August 15, 2009 by RattleNHumBar

CiceroneLogoWe have all taking the 1st step on the Cicerone syllabus:

Patrick, Roz, Sara, Marianne, Tammy, Ashley, Robin, Sine,  and Felix.

This syllabus covers the knowledge needed for the first level cerfitication–the Certified Beer Server.  The Novice Syllabus is a subset of the Master Syllabus that focuses on serving issues and the basics of beer and styles.

RNH stepping up again!

Posted in Bar/Beer Talk on August 9, 2009 by RattleNHumBar

Beer line cleanerHere at Rattle ‘N’ Hum we clean our beer lines after every keg has been kicked, today we just started using a new product to insure the cleanliness of our lines continues thus giving you the freshest, tastiest beer imaginable, the way the brewer’s intended. We are using a product from Austria that has been in testing with AB for 3 years. It’s a verification agent with line cleaning solution in powder form. We can monitor the cleaning process and inline verification with a color indicator. Chlorine free with active oxygen. It is compliant with DIN 6650 and HACCP norms.

We think that our customers have every right in knowing what happens behind the scenes of RNH as you are trusting us with your health and hope of great clean beer!!

So now you have it, peace of mind!

Federal excise Tax Increase

Posted in Bar/Beer Talk on June 16, 2009 by RattleNHumBar

Tax ExciseThank you to all who have already contacted your U.S. Senators on the issue of federal excise tax increases.

For those of you who haven’t, please immediately call and email the offices of your Senators concerning the excise tax increase being considered in the Senate Finance Committee.

The committee is at a critical point in their deliberations. We may have only hours more to make our voices heard.

Every Senator must hear a strong voice of opposition from their constituency to increasing the tax, as this will give us the best chance of turning back this proposal before any legislation is drafted.

Make these contacts now…before it’s too late.

Following is the email sent out previously on contacting Senators, with helpful background and talking points. 

BA Brewery Members,

We collectively face an extremely serious threat to the small brewing industry and to the very existence of some of its members. As you know, the Senate Finance Committee in Washington, DC has held hearings on, and is currently deliberating the merits of, a proposal to increase and equalize the excise tax for alcohol beverages in order to fund healthcare reform. This proposal would triple the excise tax for 4.5% ABV beer and impose even higher excise tax rates for higher ABV beers. 

Brewers Association staff and Board members have been actively engaged in building the case against an excise tax increase, recently submitting a letter to the Committee outlining our opposition. 

We need you to speak out now.

The ask of you is simple:

Point 1 – Oppose the Tax Increase. Contact your two U.S. Senators and let them know that you oppose, in the strongest possible terms, raising the federal excise tax on beer by any amount.

If one of your Senators sits on the Senate Finance Committee (roster of members below), urge them to oppose this proposal in committee deliberations. If your Senators are not members of that committee, ask them to contact their Finance Committee colleagues and express their opposition to this proposal moving forward.

Talking points on this issue appear below.

Point 2 – Support S. 1058. Ask them to sign on as a cosponsor of S. 1058 (identical to HR 836 introduced in the House of Representatives in February), the bill that would halve the small brewer excise tax differential, from $7.00/barrel to $3.50/barrel on the first 60,000 barrels.

Why cut taxes in an economy where funding shortfalls are rife? Because easing the tax burden on businesses in such a challenged economy will result in a reinvestment and recommitment in the very businesses that built the strong economy we once enjoyed and will enjoy again. For talking points on this legislation, see the BA Excise Tax Resource Page or simply thank your Senator if they are already a supporter (to view the current roster of Senators who have signed on, enter “S1058” in the search box as a “Bill Number” search here.

Take Action – Call and/or email your Senators’ Washington or district offices and make your personal case against this massive excise tax increase and in support of S. 1058.

As always, thanks for your support.

Charlie Papazian

President, Brewers Association

Senate Finance Committee Members: 

Baucus, Max (MT), Chairman Bingaman, Jeff (NM) 
Bunning, Jim (KY) Cantwell, Maria (WA) 
Carper, Thomas R. (DE) Conrad, Kent (ND) 
Cornyn, John (TX) Crapo, Mike (ID) 
Ensign, John (NV) Enzi, Michael B. (WY) 
Grassley, Chuck (IA), Ranking Member Hatch, Orrin G. (UT) 
Kerry, John F. (MA) Kyl, Jon (AZ) 
Lincoln, Blanche L. (AR) Menendez, Robert (NJ) 
Nelson, Bill (FL) Roberts, Pat (KS) 
Rockefeller, John D. (WV) Schumer, Charles E. (NY) 
Snowe, Olympia J. (ME) Stabenow, Debbie (MI) 
Wyden, Ron (OR) 

ISSUES OF IMPORTANCE TO SMALL BREWERS EXCISE TAXES

Small brewers are small Main street businesses, typically employing 10 to 50 employees. 

We represent only 4% of the entire U.S. beer market by volume, with 95% of us being very small businesses (producing 15,000 barrels or less per year). 
We strongly oppose proposals to increase the excise tax on beer.

Proposals to increase and equalize the tax among all types of alcohol will tax small brewers at the highest rates because our specialty, gourmet and innovative beers typically have higher alcohol contents. 
Brewers already pay a disproportionately higher share of taxes compared with other products – federal, state and local taxes represent over 40% of the retail price for beer while the same taxes equal nearly 24% of the price for all other purchases. 
Higher taxes will worsen the economic recession – resulting in less competitive products, reduced sales and revenues, lost jobs and, for some small brewers, business closures. 

$1 per case excise tax increase will typically cost the consumer at least $1.69 due to successive mark-ups as the case moves from brewer to wholesaler to retailer. 
Many small brewers are struggling to deal with the consequences of the 2008 spike in ingredient and operational costs and in the near future will also be faced with significant new costs to address pending federal labeling requirements. The cost of these new requirements for small brewers alone is collectively estimated to be up to $100 million.